Selling on iPad

No matter who you are, you’ve got something to sell, whether it be your business plan or your own personal charm. If you sell for a living like me, you try to get sales down to an exact science. 

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Dean Curtis
Why some users fear the iPad. And other lessons in app design.

Sometimes insight comes from weird places.

My co-founder Josh Koppel likes to tell the story of how, back in the day, Scrollmotion had a mega-client, a Big Pharma beast, that used our iPad software to make sales pitches to doctors. (Pharma loves the iPad because there's no risk of a salesperson leaving behind any demo materials, which could open the door to lawsuits if they contained any, uh, fatal errors.)

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Alan Braun
How I prevented a million car accidents. (Well, maybe.)

I learned about empathy at 80 miles an hour, on a highway between Columbus and Cincinnati back in 2010. I had hitched a ride with one of our sales guys and he'd teed up an endless series of conference calls for the trip. So with one hand on the wheel and the other on his phone, he worked his calendar, dialing the conference number, then flipping back really quick to his calendar for the passcode.

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Alan Braun
Getting design and engineering teams to play on the same team.

Early in my career I was a serial offender against the Gods of Design. At Micromuse we had a great designer whose work we engineers routinely violated, ripping it up and duct-taping it back together whenever it suited our purposes. That guy ended up so frustrated that he finally up and quit. (Now he now is a design lead at Google. Oops.)

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Alan Braun
The importance of doing a few things really, really well.

Where were you on January 9, 2007? Steve Jobs was onstage, introducing the first iPhone. From all reports, it had been an epic journey; some of the engineers who had worked on it were apparently sitting in the audience at the Moscone Center pounding Scotch, terrified that something would go wrong, as it had during every demo to date. Jobs was not known for his delicacy when faced with technical failure.

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Alan Braun
Learning how apps can fail has helped Ingage succeed.

There is a famous photo from 1983, just before the launch of the Macintosh, of Steve Jobs in New York, standing under an IBM sign and gleefully giving it the finger. It's a great image, and a reminder of Apple's rambunctious early spirit. But by the time I was there, 30 years later, Apple was moving from a consumer-only focus to one that increasingly included the enterprise.

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Alan Braun